Project Management Rule #1: No surprises

We have a rule for our real estate project management process:  No Surprises.

Typically our clients are either doing a major construction project to build out or expand their business space, relocating to another facility, or both.  Usually these are operations critical to providing their products or services to their customers.

So what happens when a freak storm like Hurricane Sandy arises well after the usual season, misses the tropical coast, and heads for New Jersey & New York?  Isn’t that a surprise to everyone?  Well, no.

Here’s why:  Stuff Happens.

Of course we could not predict that particular storm, but you don’t need to anticipate every possible scenario. You simply need to realize that Stuff Happens and have a contingency plan in place in case something occurs that will prevent you from executing on your plan.

Perhaps it’s a labor strike, bankruptcy of a contractor, fire, failure of a piece of equipment, unanticipated code or licensing violation, even death of a key team member.  All undesirable and unfortunate, but, from your customer’s perspective the show must go on.

Have a plan in place to deal with how you will handle unavoidable delays.  We’ve found that there are three key components to keeping your project moving forwardas anticipated, or at least with the absolute minimum disruption possible:

  1. Be Proactive – If even a hint of trouble is brewing, communicate with staff, property owners, contractors and other team members to discuss how to handle and respond immediately as problems occur.  Know operational alternatives: Can product ship from another location or staff lease temporary office space in another property?
  2. Establish Relationships in Advance – The time to look for a roofer is not after the hurricane has passed through town.  Know who you can use, talk to them in advance, and assemble your back-up response team before your project starts.
  3. Experience Counts – Staff the project with people that have experience commensurate to the importance of the project.  If you deliver mission-critical products or services, or a delay of the project puts a multi-million dollar contract at risk, don’t put a relocation/construction newbie in charge no matter how competent they are at running your [Fill in Blank] division.  Get someone who has been through many of the same situations before.  They may not anticipate a Hurricane Sandy, but they will know how to deal with seemingly insurmountable issues. A couple of those seem to happen on every major project, don’t they? No surprise there.