Interview with Eric Berson – Avocat Group CEO

You’ve negotiated commercial leases from New York and Washington D.C. to Beijing and Moscow. What has that taught you?

EB – Negotiating an office lease is like playing chess for money. Very significant amounts of money. However, unlike chess, you cannot study and learn the moves from the masters in a book or from a computer. Certainly laws vary between municipalities, although so do customs and customary lease terms. Something learned in Abu Dhabi might spark an idea for a transaction in Chicago, or vice versa. The only way to learn is through personal experience and direct involvement, and this cumulative global experience expands the solutions available.

Are there mistakes that you commonly see being made by firms leasing space?

EB – Of course. Real estate is a relationship business, primarily because it is business that requires a very high level of trust. People tend to trust the people that they know, and they should of course, but that can also cause them to be blind to recognizing competency and seeking out the highest level of expertise. For example, we often see law firms that will choose a real estate representative based on that firm sending business to the firm. So in exchange for some nominal amount of legal work that primarily benefits a few real estate partners, the entire firm might suffer six or seven figure missteps in their lease strategy.

Well, yes, that certainly could be painful. Anything else?

EB – Most firms generally do not allow enough time for planning and wait for an event, such as an expiration or need to expand, before developing a strategic plan. The real estate strategic plan should be ongoing. It should start at the beginning of a lease term, so that it can be tweaked and refined over time, and the tenant can properly position themselves with the landlord and in the market. The best time to start is not a year before the expiration.

Your website has a “Canon of Ethics” that discusses conflicts of interest. Should that be a concern?

EB – There are only two types of representation: No Conflict and Not Quite No Conflict. Which do you think is best? I’m an attorney, and each state Bar where I’m admitted has a set of rules of professional conduct that says to effect, that “a firm will not represent a client if their responsibilities to that client might be adversely affected by their responsibilities to another client”. Unfortunately, the commercial real estate industry does not hold itself to such standards and client firms tend to therefore overlook the issue. The simple fact is, a real estate company cannot represent both tenants and landlords, because the other party represents prospective business to their firm, and that can cause unfavorable judgement or pressure on the part of the representing firm. The full service firms try to explain this away by saying that they manage it, but they cannot manage both the interests of individuals in their firms and of their stockholders to maximize profit.

Your client list includes some of the largest law firms in the world and presumably some of the smartest attorneys. Does that make it more difficult for you to represent them?

EB – On the contrary, the smartest attorneys are the easiest to work with because they understand that it takes intelligence combined with experience focused in a very specialized area to create excellence. Whether hiring an attorney or a real estate advisor, or both, you have to decide whose brain power and personal experience you want working for you.