commercial lease commencement dates

A typical commercial office or industrial lease states something to the effect that the “The Commencement Date of the Lease shall be the later of X date or the date that the Landlord delivers the Premises to the Tenant.”  (Note:  If it says the “earlier of X date ….”, your landlord is really giving you a raw deal. Do not ever allow it.)

This Commencement Date language protects you in case the Landlord is late in completing construction and you don’t get possession when planned.  Right?  Wrong.  Here’s why: Read more

Mick Jagger, Net Present Value, and the new FASB IFRS Lease Accounting Rules

I took this photo of Mick Jagger when I was a photojournalism major at the University of South Florida. It made the cover of a small time music magazine, and I had visions of eventually getting my work on the cover of Rolling Stone. Just like the song.

Around the same time, I took an elective real estate course and showed the photo to my professor. The unimpressed professor said, “If your photos are great, your photojournalism degree won’t matter. And if your photos are bad, your photojournalism degree won’t matter. Why don’t you change it to a finance degree in case the photos don’t work out?” Read more

Driving Business Growth using Smart Real Estate StrategyIf you have a growing service business, you probably used to shop for office space by comparing rental rates. The lowest cost space, of comparable class alternatives, was often the best choice. That’s no longer the case.

The cost of labor, including attracting, hiring, compensating and retaining staff is typically between 8 and 12 times the cost of the real estate that houses that staff. So while you certainly don’t want to overpay, in the grand scheme the cost of the real estate is just a fraction of the cost of labor, so perfect placement to attract and retain that talent is far more critical than rate. Read more

How to Screw Up an Acquisition

Acquisitions often focus on just a handful of items: synergy, talent, perhaps geographic coverage and/or technology, and revenue of course. The investment bankers and attorneys that orchestrate the deal generally do a great job of ferreting out the business issues that need resolved. Except for the real estate. Read more

When choosing professional services, there exists an old adage that the largest providers are the safe bets. “Nobody ever got fired for hiring IBM” was the well known saying implying that a large company offered at least the reasonable perception of reduced risk over smaller firms. In regards to technology consulting, those advantages may have been real or simply perceived. When choosing commercial real estate advisors however, often the risk increases significantly as the size of the provider firm increases.

Read more

Most commercial office leases contain a provision that requires the tenant to promptly return an estopple upon request.  What exactly does this bit of legal jargon mean?

It’s actually pretty simple: an estoppel is a common legal document that serves to 1) confirm various aspects of a lease agreement and to ensure that important documents and facts are accurate, 2) affirm that the landlord has met all of his or her obligations and 3) confirm that there are no additional addenda or other modifications to the terms. Read more

When companies acquire or merge with other competing or complementary firms, real estate is, as a part of the transaction, generally a small overall concern. However, we frequently see major risk being absorbed by the acquiring firm with potential for a very negative surprise down the road. Read more

It is a great time to be a tenant, and here is another example.  Because almost all options are written with the assumption that rates will climb forever upwards, we’re seeing some interesting effects as rental rates tumble.  Some options are literally not worth the paper they we’re written on.  However, declining markets have made some usually unattractive renewal options have new value.  Here’s why: Read more

captive tenant syndrome

In a recent post, Newtons First Law, we discussed how the “house odds” favor landlords since the overwhelming majority of tenants renew their leases.  Why?

Because:

  • It is a hassle to move
  • Evaluating options would require time and effort
  • A move would cause disruption to already stretched staff resources
  • It is expensive to move

Read more

You’ve negotiated commercial leases from New York and Washington D.C. to Beijing and Moscow. What has that taught you?

EB – Negotiating an office lease is like playing chess for money. Very significant amounts of money. However, unlike chess, you cannot study and learn the moves from the masters in a book or from a computer. Certainly laws vary between municipalities, although so do customs and customary lease terms. Something learned in Abu Dhabi might spark an idea for a transaction in Chicago, or vice versa. The only way to learn is through personal experience and direct involvement, and this cumulative global experience expands the solutions available.

Are there mistakes that you commonly see being made by firms leasing space?

EB – Of course. Real estate is a relationship business, primarily because it is business that requires a very high level of trust. People tend to trust the people that they know, and they should of course, but that can also cause them to be blind to recognizing competency and seeking out the highest level of expertise. For example, we often see law firms that will choose a real estate representative based on that firm sending business to the firm. So in exchange for some nominal amount of legal work that primarily benefits a few real estate partners, the entire firm might suffer six or seven figure missteps in their lease strategy.

Well, yes, that certainly could be painful. Anything else?

EB – Most firms generally do not allow enough time for planning and wait for an event, such as an expiration or need to expand, before developing a strategic plan. The real estate strategic plan should be ongoing. It should start at the beginning of a lease term, so that it can be tweaked and refined over time, and the tenant can properly position themselves with the landlord and in the market. The best time to start is not a year before the expiration.

Your website has a “Canon of Ethics” that discusses conflicts of interest. Should that be a concern?

EB – There are only two types of representation: No Conflict and Not Quite No Conflict. Which do you think is best? I’m an attorney, and each state Bar where I’m admitted has a set of rules of professional conduct that says to effect, that “a firm will not represent a client if their responsibilities to that client might be adversely affected by their responsibilities to another client”. Unfortunately, the commercial real estate industry does not hold itself to such standards and client firms tend to therefore overlook the issue. The simple fact is, a real estate company cannot represent both tenants and landlords, because the other party represents prospective business to their firm, and that can cause unfavorable judgement or pressure on the part of the representing firm. The full service firms try to explain this away by saying that they manage it, but they cannot manage both the interests of individuals in their firms and of their stockholders to maximize profit.

Your client list includes some of the largest law firms in the world and presumably some of the smartest attorneys. Does that make it more difficult for you to represent them?

EB – On the contrary, the smartest attorneys are the easiest to work with because they understand that it takes intelligence combined with experience focused in a very specialized area to create excellence. Whether hiring an attorney or a real estate advisor, or both, you have to decide whose brain power and personal experience you want working for you.

I’m not crazy about condominiums.  Here’s why:

Other people (the condo association – which is often controlled by a very small group of individuals) get to vote on how to spend your money.  Some of those choices may not add value for you or to your property.

Operating expenses on leased commercial property work the same way. The management company, which is the property ownership or someone under their direct control, gets to decide what expenses get passed through to the property tenants. Read more

One of the easiest and most effective ways for a corporation to keep real estate costs low is to regularly perform Market Rate Audits on their leased locations.  Often many companies get caught up in reactionary tasks such as simply handling leases as they come up for expiration, so they never get ahead of the curve with a proactive approach. Read more

Newton’s First Law of Inertia:  An object at rest tends to stay at rest.

A Landlord’s First Law of Inertia:  A tenant in place is likely to renew.

How likely?  It is hard to find precise data although many Real Estate Investment Trusts report that in excess of 80% of their commercial portfolios renew.  With those kind of odds, most landlords will presume a low risk of vacancy at renewal time and in-place tenants will be offered less favorable rental terms than a new tenant coming in off the street.

Does a renewing tenant often pay more?  Absolutely. These tenants justify it with a number of flawed justifications:

Reason:  “We’re still paying less than the Landlord’s “asking” price.”
Flaw:  Nobody will end up paying the “asking” price.  The only amount that matters is the true market rate, adjusted for concessions such as free rent and improvement allowances.

Reason:  “It would cost a lot to move.”
Flaw:  It’s probably less than you think, and many firms never actually do the homework to determine the real cost.  Further, many prospective landlords will either provide a move allowance and/or a free rent period equal to or greater than these costs.

Reason:  “It is a hassle to move and a bad time due to limited staff resources.”
Flaw:  The productivity gains that are typically accomplished by improved workspace and layout often reduce facility costs 15-20% or more, and most tasks can be outsourced to relocation firms that specialize in corporate relocations thereby requiring very little staff involvement.

There is a term for this flawed mindset, Captive Tenant Syndrome, which I’ll cover in my next post.  Until then, don’t be caught sitting on your hands.