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commercial lease commencement dates

Commercial Lease Commencement Dates

A typical commercial office or industrial lease states something to the effect that the “The Commencement Date of the Lease shall be the later of X date or the date that the Landlord delivers the Premises to the Tenant.”  (Note:  If it says the “earlier of X date ….”, your landlord is really giving you a raw deal. Do not ever allow it.)

This Commencement Date language protects you in case the Landlord is late in completing construction and you don’t get possession when planned.  Right?  Wrong.  Here’s why:

Suppose that you are planning to take possession of a property on or before June 1st and your existing lease expires May 31st.  As is not unusual in commercial real estate lease transactions, getting the construction completed on time is a push but appears not unrealistic.

A week or two before June 1st, the Landlord informs you that the space will be delivered June 5th.  Your new rent will be prorated so that you don’t pay for June 1 – 4.  That’s fair, isn’t it?  Probably not.

You will be forced into a holdover position in your existing space.  If your lease is silent on the subject, most States provide that a landlord can charge double rent during a holdover period.  Many commercial leases address this issue and specify some increased rent penalty from between 125% (if you negotiated it up front) to 200%.  In addition, since rent is paid monthly, you are obligated to pay for the entire month – there is almost NEVER a provision for a daily prorated  holdover rent.  Further, you may be liable for other costs incurred by the landlord.

If he has leased the space and plans to commence build out for a new tenant, you’ll likely get charged for the overtime incurred to get them back on schedule.  If you are delayed long enough for his prospective new tenant to bail, you may get sued for the entire value of the failed lease.  Meanwhile, your new landlord’s liability is limited to compensating you by not charging for the four days of rent that you didn’t have use of the premises.  Ouch.

So how do you protect yourself?  The lease should state that “the Commencement Date will be later of June 1st (in this example) or the first of the month following delivery of the Premises by the Landlord with substantial completion and and a Certificate of Occupancy.  In the event that the Commencement Date is other than June 1st, the Landlord will pay $X for each month or each partial month of delay.”

The $X should equal the new rent plus your holdover penalty, and should include any damages charged by the existing landlord if the tenant is liable for such costs.

In addition, you should state that, in the event that the lease has not commenced by X date, the tenant may terminate the agreement on X days notice.  You can’t wait around forever.

Real Estate Strategy for Fast Growth Companies

Let’s consider the corporate headquarters of a fast growth service business. Suppose that 1) they have a preference for keeping everyone together in one contiguous space, 2) they desire to strategically minimize cost and risk, and 3) growth rate is a variable based on many factors. What is the smart way to scale facilities?

A first exercise is an assessment of current space utilization and capacity. From this, we can also get some interesting metrics such as real estate cost/staff member, cost/seat, SQFT/seat and SQFT/staff member. These metrics will be useful in extrapolating future demand. It is also worth considering the absolute constraint in expanding the maximum number of accommodated staff. For example, depending on industry and culture, in the short term it may be possible to put 2 or even 3 people in a single office, but at some point even another single person becomes unfeasible. Sometimes, and especially in suburban locations, the constraint becomes parking. In any case, you’ll want to understand this in order to create an expansion timeline.

The next step is to perform a growth sensitivity analysis. This is a projection based on anticipated growth and variances within two standard deviations of expectations. At this point you should also consider sensitivity to four external forces, 1) Economy, 2) Competition, 3) Technology and 4) Government Regulation, which could potentially impact your forecast. Using these projections and dividing by the desired SQFT/seat metric, you can anticipate minimum and maximum space demand. In general, you’ll want to define requirements in annual increments and ideally be flexible enough to cover both high and low space requirement estimates. In a perfect world, the company is paying for only the seats needed for each year, with the guaranteed ability to take additional space as necessary.

It is not always a perfect world, of course, and real estate is often inflexible and requires a high cost of construction. However, it is possible to design an occupancy strategy to be reasonably flexible and support a high growth or variable growth company. Here are a few strategies:

Buy or Build Large: The company designs or acquires a multi-tenant property that can accommodate significant growth over a long horizon. It then leases out the excess space until needed, including perhaps options to terminate the other occupant’s leases if necessary.

Lease Large: Rather than own, the company acquires space in a much larger project and secures expansion rights. These could be a series of outright “free” options, paid “reserve” options, Right of First Refusals, Right of First Offers, Guaranteed Takedowns, Right of Contractions and possibly even a direct lease of space with liberal sublease rights. Each has various advantages and risks, and every landlord will have a different tolerance for each, so they are often used in combination based upon the user company confidence on their absolute future need and timing.

Most companies will favor leasing rather than owning because it shifts a portion of the risk to the landlord, reduces both upfront and expansion construction costs, and often provides much greater expansion flexibility. Favoring a very large institutional landlord, such as a well-capitalized REIT, typically improves these benefits even further to protect upside expansion needs (although may fare worse if the user ever needs to downsize).

Finally, realize that while you cannot always cover an absolute ideal scenario at every level of possible growth rates, you can always have a plan for each. Smart companies ask, “What if…” and make sure they have a logical answer for each potential outcome.

The Eight P&L Impacts of a Corporate Lease

The Eight P&L Impacts of a Corporate Lease

On many CFO and financial executive’s Urgent Issues or Focus List, real estate often doesn’t make the top ten. Why? I think in part it is because the impact of a real estate decision is spread over many categories of the Profit & Loss Statement. (I won’t get into FASB ASC 842 even though it is one of my favorite topics — for now anyway, keeping watching this space for future posts)

Often financial analysis of a lease decision is based on the rent and operating expense being paid now vs. the rent and operating expense on the new lease. If the impact is acceptable, the company moves forward. Simple enough, right? Perhaps too simple.

Why? Expenses related to a lease are generally as follows:

  1. Rent
  2. Operating Expenses (passed through by Landlord, usually inclusive of Property Tax and Insurance although often further broken out if paid direct by Tenant)
  3. Utilities (not included in charges above)
  4. Repairs and Maintenance (that are responsibility of the Tenant)
  5. Relocation Expense
  6. Furniture, Fixtures, & Equipment — Capital Expense and Depreciation
  7. Technology — Capital Expense and Depreciation
  8. Leasehold Improvements – Depreciation

There can be others of course based on specific uses, although the above are common across most operations.

Any comprehensive analysis needs to consider all of these costs. More importantly, you need to compare not just the current rental rates, but instead the rent amounts actually appearing on the P&L — typically a straight lined value. In today’s market, the SL rate of an old lease can be significantly below the SL rate of a new long term lease.

In addition, look closely at fully amortized leaseholds and other depreciation items that may be coming off of the books at the expiration of the current term. A renewal in an existing space may provide significant savings even when rent increases if the amortized numbers are significant.

The key to correct analysis is habit. Set up a template that works for your business. Many packaged real estate analysis solutions focus on making predictions based on future escalations. What the last roller coaster dip in the economy should have taught us is that projections are simply guesses — and often not good ones.

Instead focus on the certainties of a lease obligation and their impact on your business. You may be surprised after looking at the cumulative effect of all of the categories mentioned above and decide to set real estate priorities a bit higher on your Focus List.

real estate is like poker

CRE 101: If you can’t spot the sucker at the table…

Don’t be so naive to think that just anyone in your company can handle your office or facility lease negotiations. It’s not like leasing an apartment, but more like playing poker against Doyle Brunson (2-time World Series Champ/Hall of Fame). Just like your landlord, Doyle would be plenty nice to you and let you go on believing you belong at the table, but at the end of the day, he’ll have your money…and you’re none the wiser.

In commercial real estate, an institutional landlord’s core competency is to maximize the investment returns on their properties. That’s all they do, every day…and they’re really good at it. Not to mention, they hire teams of professionals to help them fill space at the best possible rates, under the most beneficial terms. A landlord’s entourage includes an army of attorneys, architects, property managers, and real estate brokers – all charged with representing the interests of the landlord.

This representation can include the obvious stuff like the landlord’s broker marketing available space to new tenants, or his real estate attorney crafting language in a lease document. It can also involve not-so-obvious stuff like when the property manager pops in to say hello or strikes up a conversation in the hallway. Yes, he wants to know how the AC is holding up, but he’s really gauging your likelihood of relocation, or whether you’re starting to look around at options. Again, like in poker, they’re thinking of this stuff all the time, and the little things add up to big leverage.

Larger sized space users dealing with 7 and 8-figure lease obligations understand full well the business risks involved with playing at such an immense disadvantage.  With so much at stake, these firms choose to either make real estate a core competency with an in-house real estate department, or outsource this expertise through dedicated corporate real estate firms. Either way, in capturing co-broke commissions, there’s enough money to go around to pay for this expertise, often with surplus to hire in-house legal, architectural, and construction management services. It’s a no-brainer for these guys.

Smaller and mid-sized firms are the ones who often miss the boat when it comes to managing facility related expenses, quite literally leaving money and business flexibility on the table. They only think of their lease when expirations come up, and even then wait way too long. Landlords slow play the deal and tenants find themselves captive, without options. Imagine that, Doyle had the cards all along…he’s so lucky.

Unlike poker, there’s money literally set aside for the benefit of tenants…if only they choose to use it wisely. 

In most markets, 6 – 8 % of a commercial tenant’s total lease obligation is committed to brokerage commissions by landlords. This is not an arbitrary number, but a market driven expense for the landlord to best attract vetted, viable candidates to lease space.

This money is split between the landlord’s broker and tenant’s broker, paid out whether the tenant has representation or not. Roughly half the commission goes to the landlord’s broker for their role in marketing the space and getting the deal done. The other half is allocated to the tenant’s broker for introducing a bona fide candidate tenant to the landlord’s space (even in renewals). The landlord is happy to pay this fee to keep his building occupied.

Sticking with our poker analogy, real estate offers tenants the chance to bring some paid expertise to represent their interests on their side of the table. Unless you know how the game is played, nobody on the landlord’s team will ever tell you this.

Think of Phil Hellmuth (another World Series Champ) sitting down next to you at the poker table helping you play your hand. Doyle won’t be pulling the same tricks with Phil that he would without Phil being there. It’s the same in real estate…and it’s already paid for.

If you hire a good firm, this means you get full scale deal coordination, negotiation and strategic insights (stuff you’ll never think of), evaluation of all alternatives, integration of real estate into overall strategic planning, and a host of other services getting you to the finish line. If tenants are clever, there’s often money to spare which can be allocated to legal, space planning and/or construction services.

Naturally, as deal sizes reduce, there’s less money to go around on both the landlord’s side and the tenant’s side. You may not be able to get Phil Hellmuth, but then again, you’re probably not playing against Doyle Brunson either. In any deal above just a couple thousand square feet, you should be able to interview and find a suitable tenant representation broker to guide you through the process and ensure best possible economic terms in your next lease. The system allows for you to have representation, choose wisely.

If you don’t properly evaluate your alternatives, you won’t even know what a “good deal” is. A pair of 7’s might be a good hand in some games, but certainly not in others. In real estate, you have to work hard to see the other players’ cards.

The part where our poker comparison falls apart is when the deal is done. In poker, it’s obvious that you lost when all the chips are with the other guy. Commercial lease transactions are far more sinister. The devil is in the details in terms of what the market will bear…rent escalations, pass through operating expenses, maintenance obligations, holdover/assignment/subletting provisions, insurance requirements, legal terms, and and endless array of clauses often egregiously in favor of the landlord. Worse, opposing brokers and landlords allow you to go on thinking you’ve gotten a great deal under fair terms. Except perhaps later in hindsight, you won’t ever know you’ve been had.

As originally posted by Casey Bourque on LinkedIn

What’s a Renewal Option Worth?

It is a great time to be a tenant, and here is another example.  Because almost all options are written with the assumption that rates will climb forever upwards, we’re seeing some interesting effects as rental rates tumble.  Some options are literally not worth the paper they we’re written on.  However, declining markets have made some usually unattractive renewal options have new value.  Here’s why:

In an appreciating market, it is typically most desirable for a tenant to have a “defined” option.  That means that the rent is spelled out in an actual dollar rate/SQFT or a percentage increase over the last year of the original lease term.  Simple enough, and in a declining market, of limited value.

In recent years, however, many landlords resisted defining future rates and instead insisted on “market rate” renewals.  You can guess where this is headed, right?

If the options provided for market rate renewals and especially if the option has a well constructed method for determining market rate – such as an appraisal or “comparable space within the project adjusted for concessions and construction allowances” – there may be a tremendous opportunity to lock in attractive rental rates.  Best of all, many options can be exercised at any time before a certain date meaning that the tenant can lock in while rates are low even if the expiration is years away.

Be prepared for the landlord to scream bloody murder because they may have a more optimistic view of future market conditions.  At the time of writing, many markets are still in relatively early stages of decline so if your expiration is a long way off it may be best to wait it out a bit longer.  Real estate values are difficult to predict more than 18 months out although can be gauged with relative accuracy within the next 18 months.  Watch your market(s) closely and exercise your market options near the bottom of the cycle.

Better yet, simply inform your landlord that you will be exercising the option, show them the justification of rates, and then negotiate revised terms beginning now.  You may be able to structure immediate rent relief and negotiate in expansion or contraction, immediate improvements, or other concessions.  Either way, you should end up paying less rent.

operating expense pass through

Operating Expense Pass Throughs – Protecting Yourself

I’m not crazy about condominiums.  Here’s why:  Other people (the condo association – which is often controlled by a very small group of individuals) get to vote on how to spend your money.  Some of those choices may not add value for you or to your property.  Operating expenses on leased commercial property work the same way.  The management company, which is the property ownership or someone under their direct control, gets to decide what expenses get passed through to the property tenants.  So what expenses do they pass through?  Every single one that they can possibly get away with.  There are only two methods of protection for tenants, and I’d estimate that more than half of all leases don’t fully take advantage of them.

Protection #1:  Operating Expense Exclusions.

Most commercial leases say something to the effect that the landlord may pass through all expenses (or the expenses over a base year) related to the ownership, maintenance, and operation of the project.  As long as these expenses are market competitive, that’s fair or at least customary, right?  Wrong.  The landlord should only be passing through the costs of maintenance and operation, not ownership.  Ownership could include costs of refinancing, marketing the property for sale or lease, legal costs related to the ownership structure, accounting fees for ownership tax returns – even income tax.  Taxes are a cost of ownership.  My point is, you need to exclude those costs and any other costs with specific language because the landlord’s thirty or fifty page document (or more, I’ve completed leases of more than a hundred pages and the landlord’s attorney didn’t have a single word in there by mistake) allows everything including their Christmas party, executive meetings in Las Vegas, and hiring family members to provide management or lawn service.  You need to have a long list of what is NOT allowable, and argue to get them into every lease.  You won’t always succeed on every item, though you should always try.

Protection #2: Auditing.

You need to audit the Operating Expense Reconciliation that you receive from your landlord annually.  Why?  Because if you have used Protection #1 to modify your lease in any way, you can bet that whomever actually does the bookkeeping has never bothered to read the changes that you made to the provision.  My firm has seen landlords ignore negotiated caps or limits included in the lease and include capital improvement costs, expenses directly for the benefit of a another tenant, costs related to code issues that existed before the tenant’s lease commenced, and costs for services that were not competitively bid and significantly out of line with the market.  If you don’t have the time, expertise, or resources to audit the reconciliations yourself, hire an outside firm on a contingent basis. Most importantly, do it in the first year of your lease, so that you 1) put the landlord on notice that you are the “auditing type” – most tenants are not – and will nail them on any inappropriate charges and 2) identify any issues early in the relationship, since most leases prevent you from challenging expenses or auditing prior years after a certain period – some as short as 30 days after receipt of the reconciliation.

A recent trend that we’re seeing is the inclusion of six-figure executive salaries(with titles such as Asset Manager or Director of Properties) usually split between several properties.  As the economy puts the pinch on commercial landlords, they are allocating as much of their overhead as possible to their portfolio’s operating expenses.  If you are lucky, you’ll have inserted language into the original lease that prohibits salaries above a property manager.  And if you’re smart, you’ll audit the operating expense reconciliation to enforce your rights.  When it comes to pass-through expense, Less is most certainly More.

captive tenant syndrome

Captive Tenant Syndrome

In a recent post, Newtons First Law, we discussed how the “house odds” favor landlords since the overwhelming majority of tenants renew their leases.  Why?

Because:

  • It is a hassle to move
  • Evaluating options would require time and effort
  • A move would cause disruption to already stretched staff resources
  • It is expensive to move

OK, good points.  However, tenants who adopt the above mindset without actually quantifying or verifying those suspicions, are commonly said to be suffering from “Captive Tenant Syndrome” – the mistaken belief that they are being held hostage in their own space.
What if those issues could be minimized or mitigated entirely?  What if the design efficiency of the new office offset the effort required?  What if the improved morale of an exciting new workplace improved productivity?  What if the new landlord absorbed the cost of the move and paid to outsource the coordination the move?

And most importantly perhaps, what would a move cost the existing landlord?

Landlords know that every tenant considers the above bullet points when facing a lease expiration, and they typically count on it to achieve higher profits on renewal leases than they do on new leases.

Remember that, for an existing landlord, a vacating tenant means:

  • Vacancy expense in lost rent (often 6-12 months)
  • Free Rent to attract a new tenant
  • Operating expense carry for property tax, insurance, and non-variable expenses
  • Additional vacancy expense during design and construction for new tenant improvements
  • Tenant improvement costs (usually significantly in excess of a renewal refurbishment)

I’m not advocating that you put on the boxing gloves and get in the ring with the landlord, my point is simply that there are significant costs to both parties and any extension should be a collaborative effort that acknowledges that both parties might reasonably benefit from the renewal.

So how do you avoid leaving money on the table when your commercial lease expiration is approaching?  Here’s what you don’t do: Bluff.  A sophisticated landlord can sense a bluff the way a pitbull can sense fear.  It’s not that landlords are bad guys (or pitbulls – my apologies to offended landlords or pitbull owners), it’s just that it is their JOB to maximize return to their investors.  That means, getting the highest possible rents from tenants.  And the low hanging fruit is not in attracting new tenants, it is capitalizing on the ones in place.

So you have to make it real.  I know that you may think you want to stay.  I know that you may think your preference is a renewal.  Perhaps that really is the best option for you. However to get the best terms, you have to make a serious evaluation of relocation options.  Not just a check of the Business Journal to get an idea of market rates.  Search spaces, tour, meet with prospective landlords, do space plans, get construction estimates, issue formal Requests for Proposals, and prepare a fully loaded financial analysis.

Only then will you know the true cost of a relocation.  Only then can you weigh the true pros and cons.  And only then will you be able to either negotiate a fair market renewal or decide that the advantages to move may outweigh disadvantages.

Dubai commercial real estate

Case Study: The Burj Dubai

The world’s tallest building is perhaps the greatest architectural and engineering accomplishment of man.  While most construction methods used for our local homes and buildings have not changed in the last 50 years or so, the Burj Dubai pushes the envelope of technology, sustainability, and functionality.

The fact sheet is amazing.  For example, the concrete used in the structure would be sufficient to build a sidewalk 2,065 miles long – about the distance from NYC to Monterrey, Mexico.

Here’s an infographic with more detail:

worldstallesttowertheburjkhalifa_52d2af15985d4_w540

Two ways to protect yourself on operating expense pass-throughs

I’m not crazy about condominiums.  Here’s why:

Other people (the condo association – which is often controlled by a very small group of individuals) get to vote on how to spend your money.  Some of those choices may not add value for you or to your property.

Operating expenses on leased commercial property work the same way. The management company, which is the property ownership or someone under their direct control, gets to decide what expenses get passed through to the property tenants.

So what expenses do they pass through?  Every single one that they can possibly get away with.  There are only two methods of protection for tenants, and I’d estimate that more than half of all leases don’t fully take advantage of them.

Protection #1:  Operating Expense Exclusions
Most commercial leases say something to the effect that the landlord may pass through all expenses (or the expenses over a base year) related to the ownership, maintenance, and operation of the project.  As long as these expenses are market competitive, that’s fair or at least customary, right?  Wrong.

The landlord should only be passing through the costs of maintenance and operation, not ownership.  Ownership could include costs of refinancing, marketing the property for sale or lease, legal costs related to the ownership structure, accounting fees for ownership tax returns – even income tax.  Taxes are a cost of ownership.

My point is, you need to exclude those costs and any other costs with specific language because the landlord’s thirty or fifty page document (or more, I’ve completed leases of more than a hundred pages and the landlord’s attorney didn’t have a single word in there by mistake) allows everything including their Christmas party, executive meetings in Las Vegas, and hiring family members to provide management or lawn service.  You need to have a long list of what is NOT allowable, and argue to get them into every lease.  You won’t always succeed on every item, though you should always try.

Protection #2: Auditing
You need to audit the Operating Expense Reconciliation that you receive from your landlord annually.  Why?  Because if you have used Protection #1 to modify your lease in any way, you can bet that whomever actually does the bookkeeping has never bothered to read the changes that you made to the provision.

My firm has seen landlords ignore negotiated caps or limits included in the lease and include capital improvement costs, expenses directly for the benefit of a another tenant, costs related to code issues that existed before the tenant’s lease commenced, and costs for services that were not competitively bid and significantly out of line with the market.

If you don’t have the time, expertise, or resources to audit the reconciliations yourself, hire an outside firm on a contingent basis. Most importantly, do it in the first year of your lease, so that you:

  1. Put the landlord on notice that you are the “auditing type” – most tenants are not – and will nail them on any inappropriate charges.
  2. Identify any issues early in the relationship, since most leases prevent you from challenging expenses or auditing prior years after a certain period – some as short as 30 days after receipt of the reconciliation.

A recent trend that we’re seeing is the inclusion of six-figure executive salaries (with titles such as Asset Manager or Director of Properties) usually split between several properties.  As the economy puts the pinch on commercial landlords, they are allocating as much of their overhead as possible to their portfolio’s operating expenses.

If you are lucky, you’ll have inserted language into the original lease that prohibits salaries above a property manager.  And if you’re smart, you’ll audit the operating expense reconciliation to enforce your rights.  When it comes to pass-through expenses, Less is most certainly More.

Market Rate Audits for commercial leases

One of the easiest and most effective ways for a corporation to keep real estate costs low is to regularly perform Market Rate Audits on their leased locations.  Often many companies get caught up in reactionary tasks such as simply handling leases as they come up for expiration, so they never get ahead of the curve with a proactive approach.

Here’s how the Market Rate Audit usually works: Whether a firm has just a handful of locations or several hundred, each lease with less than 5 years remaining in term is evaluated and compared to actual available alternative spaces in their respective markets.  Rather than rely on the general occupancy and rate statistics published by the large landlord rep firms such as CBRE, JLL or C&W, this exercise involves actually identifying specific spaces that, if the lease were expiring in the next 12 months, would be feasible for a relocation.

While nobody has a crystal ball to predict what rates will be in the long term, rates for the next 18-24 months can be forecasted surprisingly well by looking at occupancy, absorption, and property under construction. Knowing existing feasible alternatives combined with construction – it takes generally 18 months or longer to get entitlements, permits, and build a new commercial facility – can give a very precise picture of what rental rates will be over the near horizon.

Many people fail to consider that leases are just like mortgages – a financing tool to occupy or control a property. And just like mortgages, when rates are low, it makes sense to restructure them and capture the lower rate.  Likewise, if rates are escalating and lack of new construction would not provide additional supply – the rules of supply and demand apply here of course – it may also make sense to lock in early before rates increase further.

The benefits of a Market Rate Audit to the corporation are:

  1. They become proactive to manage rental costs to take advantage of low points in the market.
  2. They become aware of any significant increases – many markets have rebounded to rates above their prior peaks – so no surprises.
  3. If market terms become unfavorable they have adequate time to plan alternatives such as build to suit options or even shifting facilities to other markets.
  4. The audits can be done on contingency with the auditing firm only billing to the extent that savings are immediately realized.

The Market Rate Audit is a low risk, low cost, smart portfolio strategy to take a proactive approach to corporate leases.

7 Red flags that may indicate the need for a lease compliance review

By Ed Harris
(Editors Note:  Ed Harris is VP of Commercial Tenant Services, a NYC-based auditing firm that specializes in corporate lease review. We hope you enjoy this guest article.)

Few areas hold as much impact on capital outlay as real estate and leasehold expenses. Ensuring that your company is not overpaying is integral to fiscal management.

  1. Significant Jumps in Operating Expenses / Additional Rent
    Performing a simple trend analysis of your year-to-year operating expense obligation is a must. And while inflationary and market forces generally create an escalating building operating expense profile, when you see a marked jump in expenses issued to you, a red flag should rise. Causes of significant jumps might include new and potentially lease impermissible capital projects, new expense categories not reflected in your base year, new contracts or vendor changes and/or related party issues, and newly increased or above standard services which are not reflected in your base year.
  2. Change in Property Ownership / Property Manager
    A change in property ownership or property management should always trigger a lease audit. Property management changes create a very real risk of affecting accounting category integrity which is integral to an apples-to-apples comparison to your base year level. Management fee levels and composition, related party vendors, and changing service levels are also common building operating expense issues when a building changing ownership or management. Another potential trap fall in a building transaction is the tenant estoppel which, if not carefully worded, has the potential to sign away rights or leverage. Finally, once a building changes hand, future audit finds and recoveries may become complicated should overcharges be identified in years under previous ownership.
  3. Building Undergoing Capital Improvements or Renovations
    If you are walking into your building and notice construction – audit your landlord. Renovations and capital projects may be subject to your lease operating expenses exclusions, and every project should be audited for permissibility under your lease. And while you are most likely obligated to reimburse the landlord for a true building operating cost, you probably are not obligated to reimburse your landlord for increasing the value of his/her building if it does not reduce building operating costs in the future. And if your building had undergone renovations and/or capital improvements in past and unaudited years, it may not be too late. Those costs were most likely amortized across future years, and there may still be an opportunity for avoid ongoing expenses if they prove to be impermissible per your lease exclusions.
  4. Your Lease is Commencing / Expiring
    Perhaps the most valuable times to have a lease audit performed are at the commencement and expiration of your lease. If you occupy under a base year lease, the valuation of your base year will have material impact on your leasehold expenses throughout the term of the lease. It is in your direct interest to both validate all charges in Year One, and to validate expense levels so as to not undervalue your base year. Likewise, lease audits should always be performed as a standard practice at any lease expiration. Not only might you lose rights to recoup any overcharges after vacating the premises (audit windows), you may lose significant leverages after your move. Lease audits and the potential uncovering of over- or mischarges may also have a material impact on any lease renewal negotiations and construction of lease amendment/renewal language.
  5. Sizable Shifts in Building Occupancy Levels
    Accounting for accurate building occupancy levels is integral to an accurate gross up methodology and can have enormous implications to your operating expenses obligation. This can be significantly magnified vis-à-vis fixed versus variable occupancy-level driven expenses should the vacancy rate in your building be sizable. And of course it directly benefits the fiscally conscious tenant to ensure that occupancy shifts are accurately reflected within a given expense period.
  6. No or Limited Backup Supplied to Annual Reconciliation Statements
    Just as you would not accept your credit card statements if they did not itemize your charges, accepting an annual reconciliation on face value is fiscally unwise. Yearend reconciliations can carry significant and lease term long financial impact – particularly if your lease terms include caps or index-driven escalators. And any failure to timely challenge a landlord’s computations and/or inclusions may forfeit your rights thereafter per potential audit windows as discussed above. Accepting a rudimentary reconciliation, even one broken down to expenses per billing category is to trust your company’s finances to an outside party with a vested interest in maximizing its profits. Whenever an annual reconciliation crosses your real estate department’s desk without sufficient back up to verify expenses and calculations, a lease audit should automatically be triggered.
  7. Building or Landlord is in Financial Straits
    While it might not always be obvious, it is in a tenant’s best interests to periodically inquire into a building and its owner’s financial wellbeing. These are difficult financial times, and few sectors have been hit as hard as commercial real estate. Commercial Tenant Services (CTS) has uncovered multiple examples of landlords in difficult financial straits materially overcharging their tenants. And while we would never suggest that such a situation directly underlies the overcharge in any specific example, the coinciding of the two – a landlord in financial distress and overcharges to its tenants – can be a recurring theme.

It is important to remember that auditing your landlord issued expenses is your right. It is sound fiscal practice and required compliance protocol in many of the most efficiently run companies in the North American markets. Lease audit has become commonplace, and chances are your landlord has been audited by its tenants many times before your inquiry. Nowadays, landlords expect to be lease audited and have generally already prepared for your call.

Edward Harris is the co-founder of Commercial Tenant Services and has over twenty-five years of real estate finance and lease audit experience. Mr. Harris holds degrees in physics and engineering from Columbia University, and an MBA joint degree in Real Estate Finance and Operations Research from the Graduate School of Business at Columbia University.

Are you paying for imaginary space?

If you go into the grocer and purchase, for example, three pounds of salmon, you can be relatively certain that you now possess three pounds of salmon.  However, if you lease 30,000 SQFT of space in an office building, can you be relatively certain that you possess 30,000 SQFT?  Absolutely not.

Here’s why:
To start, there is the concept of “rentable” and “usable” space.  In summary, “usable space” is the space actually contained within your walls, and “rentable space” is the same number plus your proportionate share of all common elements such as elevator lobbies, bathrooms, fire stairs, and mechanical rooms.  If you lease half of a floor, the rentable calculation would apportion half of those elements for your use and add that amount to your usable calculation.

The American National Standards Industry (ANSI) has created very detailed specifications on how to create accurate measurements.  For example, dimensions are taken from the interior of glass windows to the mid-point of the wall for any walls shared in common with other tenants, etc.  This standard has been adopted by The Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) and some landlords agree to adopt these standards.  Fair enough.

But there is another scenario which can cost you thousands, perhaps even tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars over the term of your occupancy:  Phantom Space.  This is when either the usable or the rentable numbers or both are inflated above the actual or proper numbers.  Sometimes this occurs because the Landlord or their representatives choose to ignore the ANSI/BOMA standards in favor of their own.  These may be based on a measurement of the landlord’s choosing (the drip line of the roof for example) or could be, well, anything that they decide which may or may not be based on a real metric.  Illegal?  No, because all aspects of a lease are negotiable – including the basis for measurement – and the landlords that do this almost certainly have very smart attorneys who put language in the lease that will indemnify them and prevent recalculation to any reality-based standards.

Do you think this is a low risk concern?  A May, 2014 article in the Wall Street Journal details how the MetLife Building has somehow grown from it’s original 2.4M SQFT in 1979 to 3M SQFT today.  Indeed, NYC is notorious for floor measurements that have in some cases exceeded the outside measurement of the actual building.  Many real estate firms, including one quoted in the article that purports to represent tenants, turn a blind eye to the practice and shrug it off with the attitude, “It’s an important enough market that they (the Landlords) can make their own rules”.

How do you protect yourself?  Take these precautions:

1. Insist that measurements and rentable adjustments be done in accordance with ANSI/BOMA standards.  Note that The International Property Measurement Standards Coalition mentioned in the article is working towards a global standards, although it will likely be years before it is adopted in any significant way – and more likely never by unscrupulous landlords.

2. Hire your own architect, rather than relying on the Landlord’s architect.  The architect, like most professionals, has a fiduciary responsibility to their client.  Make sure that you have someone on whom you can rely for accurate and honest representations.

3. Include language in the Lease document that affirms measurement to to ANSI standards and allows for adjustment if a discrepancy is discovered.

4. Be certain that you have a tenant representative that insists on the items above, manages the transaction to meet ANSI compliance, and will not passively accept the non-conforming measurements of unscrupulous landlords.

When it comes to Phantom Space, Less is More.

Month-to-Month Could Be 15-Days to the Curb

We are working with a multi-location user with several leases in an unnecessarily precarious state of month-to-month lease term. As they are finding, this situation leaves them extremely vulnerable…more so than they imagined.

In Florida this month-to-month tenancy is a tenancy at will which is cancelable by giving “—not less than fifteen (15) days notice prior to the end of any monthly period.”  So rather than requiring a notice period equal to the rental period, that is, one month, as little as fifteen (15) days notice is all that is necessary.

Consider a month-to-month holdover with rent paid in advance for the month of January. The landlord could terminate this tenancy at will in Florida with a notice delivered on January 16th. (See Florida Statutes Sections 83.02-83.03).

In the case of our client, they require unique tenant improvements and industry  permitting prior to occupancy in a new location. With only weeks to vacate and occupy a new location, they would need to close their doors for up to 3 months.

The good news is that this situation is easily avoidable. Have a real estate expert take a look at any leases expiring within the next 12-24 months to fully understand your timing and requirements should you decide to vacate your space. At minimum, a single page addendum should be permissible requiring either party to provide at least 90 or 180 days notice in a month-to-month or holdover situation.

As originally posted by Casey Bourque on LinkedIn